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How Do You Feel About Telltale's Direction?

posted by Alcoremortis on - last edited - Viewed by 4.3K users

Just like the good old days, back when a simple discussion of who the best male and female users on the forum were could turn into half the people here changing their avatars to eyevatars... and still seem perfectly natural.

I miss those days.

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  • @der_ketzer said: Finally something we kinda agree on.
    Now let's discuss again how disappointing Portal 2 was.

    Not very. I loved Portal 2. Nowhere near as much as I loved Portal, though. The gel was a cool addition and I still put it as one of my favourite games. Just people who seem to like it more than the first do so because of how it was much more of a production, which is what I didn't like about it. I loved Portal because it was just a small project that a small group in Valve was working on. They didn't expect anything from it, which is why they just stuck it in the Orange Box. That's what I loved about it and made it my favourite game. It was the perfect length and the perfect difficulty. It was funny and had great characters. Don't get me wrong, Portal 2's characters were great, too. Cave and Wheatley were amazingly well done, but I preferred it when it was just you and GLaDOS (and Companion Cube). Problem is, Portal will never be able to be a small project again since it became such an enormous hit. Which is why, though I might foam at the mouth at mention of a Portal sequel, I'll never expect any of them to reach the level of the first in my book.

  • SHODAN, hmm. Dishonored is somewhat a mix of Thief and Dark Messiah (another Arcane Studios game).

    Ironically, I remember a few Adventure Game websites Adventure Gamers, and Just Adventures IIRC, praising the Thief games (First Person Sneakers) as having the atmospheric and production values of the best Adventure games. What with the exploration, and slow-paced development of the story (having to find letters, and books etc), without relying on too much action.

    http://betax1.justadventure.com/reviews/Thief/Thief_Gold.shtm

    http://betax1.justadventure.com/reviews/Thief/Thief.shtm

    But it seemed to be the kind of game that would be outside of styles an Adventure Game website would usually review.

    OF course Dishonored makes partially similar gameplay, but makes it far more frenetic... Even trying to keep to pure stealth, non-kill requires some acrobatic quick movements to succeed.

    Thief 4 may be going that same direction.

  • @Darth Marsden said: See, now, I worded my choices VERY carefully so that every game you could think of as an 'adventure' would fall under one of those four subgenres. I didn't just throw them out willy-nilly. I PLANNED this thing. Like, properly.

    You give me an example - anything - and I'll tell you exactly why it's one of those four. Without fail.

    Go on. Try me.

    I can only pick on examples I've personally played. Text Adventures, Leisure Suit Larry in the Land of the Lounge Lizards (AGI version), Escape from Monkey Island and Grim Fandango all have no mouse support and yet fit into Classic. LSL1-6 can all be played easily without a mouse (SMI and MI2 can be too but it's a faff). LOOM is not inventory-based and yet probably falls within Classic territory. Heavy Rain had choices that influenced your game much more than in TWD and yet had Action elements rather than inventory elements. I'm guessing Fables will be both inventory based and choice tree based. S&M Season 3 saw a dramatic shift away from inventory-based gameplay. Where would you put that? Indiana Jones had different story based on decisions made in dialogue and had Action elements. Many of the earlier Graphic Adventures (even as far as MI2!) had pixel hunting, which is the only gameplay element in Hidden Object games, so where do you put the lines? Looks a bit flimsy to me, this pigeonholing.

  • First of all, let's recap on the catagories.

    - Classic Adventure
    - Story Adventure, aka Cinematic Adventure (just thought of that, much better name for it)
    - Puzzle Adventure
    The whole Failed Adventure thing was me taking a dig at Hidden Object games, so forget about that one.

    Heavy Rain is obviously a Cinematic Adventure, while Sam & Max: TDP is still Classic, though you can see elements of Cinematic creeping in. As for those earlier games you mention... I'd need an example or two to really see what you mean.

  • I'd say both the psychic abilities in S&M:S3 and the chords you pick up in Loom constitutes an inventory of sorts, so they fall well within the definition of classic adventure. I also don't think a couple of pixel hunting situations makes enough of an influence on a game to compare it to the abomination that is hidden object games. And I don't remember any pixel hunting in the first two Monkey Islands. Fate of Atlantis did have this problem though.

  • @tbm1986 said: so where do you put the lines? Looks a bit flimsy to me, this pigeonholing.

    It's kinda like... the combination of the different aspects of an adventure game can add up together to make it a classic, cinematic or puzzle adventure.

    That is to say, a game can be more cinematic in this way while more classic in that, while another is considered cinematic for different reasons.

    Kind of like a math problem. X + Y + Z = "Adventure"
    Where the values are individually graded on a scale.
    For this scenario, let's give "cinematic" values on each scale for each variable a negative numerical value; while "classic" values for each variable have a positive numerical value. Also, if we consider each aspect to be more or less important to the equation, we might instead write the equation as something like 2x + 1.5y + z = "Adventure"

    In this case, if "Adventure" equals a negative numerical value, it is cinematic. If it has a positive numerical value, it is classic.


    EDIT: Also, maybe it could be said that if "adventure" has a given value close enough to zero, it is then a Puzzle Adventure; where the overall value of "adventure" is affected by how the values of "puzzle" and "story" relate to each other.

  • Dude, you sound like my old maths teacher. Don't be that guy, he sucked. :p

  • @Darth Marsden said: Dude, you sound like my old maths teacher. Don't be that guy, he sucked. :p

    :)

    Well, he was like "those are stupid classifications because this classic game is that way and that cinematic game is this way"; and I was thinking "no, it depends on how each part combines and interacts with each other".


    With that in mind, someone else can feel free to come along and turn it into a chemistry lesson instead of an algebra problem. :D

  • @flesk said: I'd say both the psychic abilities in S&M:S3 and the chords you pick up in Loom constitutes an inventory of sorts, so they fall well within the definition of classic adventure.

    Fair enough.

    @flesk said: I also don't think a couple of pixel hunting situations makes enough of an influence on a game to compare it to the abomination that is hidden object games. And I don't remember any pixel hunting in the first two Monkey Islands.

    SMI: Makeshift posts for the bundles of rope; bananas in fruit bowl; loose floorboard; room exits in the caves.
    MI2: Ash-2-Life; string; the gags in the International House of Mojo and in the odds shop; explosives storage; room where the BW chest lands while it's dark; coin return; trash can (once Guybrush is standing in front of it); syringe drawer.

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