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How Do You Feel About Telltale's Direction?

posted by Alcoremortis on - last edited - Viewed by 4.4K users

Just like the good old days, back when a simple discussion of who the best male and female users on the forum were could turn into half the people here changing their avatars to eyevatars... and still seem perfectly natural.

I miss those days.

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  • @Chyron8472 said: :)
    With that in mind, someone else can feel free to come along and turn it into a chemistry lesson instead of an algebra problem. :D

    Your algebra works while there are only two variables. As soon as you have a third, you have to rate each (eg. out of 10 or & composition) and go for the variable with the highest value.

  • I was a fan of Telltale Games from 2006 to 2010. It was fun. Since then, they've released nothing that interests me and it's now clear that they never will. It's only quite recently that I finally admitted this to myself. I guess it's fine that they've decided to ignore where they've come from in favor of where they're going, but it is kind of disappointing.

    What's more disappointing than the fact that they've decided to stop making adventure games (as I consider them; you are free to disagree) is the way the company's image and culture have changed. There was a time when Telltale Games represented, to me, the hope that game developers didn't have to be cold and indifferent to their fans. They listened, they interacted, they were incredibly responsive to our every concern. Actual devs posted on the forums. When I had a problem, I told old-tyme TTG rep Emily and she went so far out of her way to help me that I was amazed, and I told her so in an email.

    Here's what I said:

    I want to say that you guys are fantastic, and not just for keeping the adventure genre alive with some really great games (although certainly that!). The way Telltale does... well, everything impresses me, from customer service (When the first sam and max DVD came out, I didn't have a DVD-ROM drive... you guys sent me a CD-ROM even though I was the only one with this issue, and still sent me the DVD to boot!) to giving the people what they want (Around the time TT formed, the cries for Sam and Max were everywhere, and you brought us Sam and Max. Almost as incessant were the demands for Monkey Island, and although it must have taken a lot of doing, now you've done that too). You guys really listen to and communicate with your fans, and I really appreciate it. Even in press releases and on the website, where most game companies would use stilted PR speak, Telltale communicates in a way that immediately sets a gamer like me at ease - "don't worry, man, we get it."

    Boy, was I ever a satisfied customer. To me, Telltale seems to no longer be the sort of company I was talking about there - now they're like most game companies, which disappoints me. Plenty of people like their new games and I honestly wish them success, but I won't be paying much attention anymore.

  • @tim333 said: I was a fan of Telltale Games from 2006 to 2010. It was fun. Since then, they've released nothing that interests me and it's now clear that they never will. It's only quite recently that I finally admitted this to myself. I guess it's fine that they've decided to ignore where they've come from in favor of where they're going, but it is kind of disappointing.

    What's more disappointing than the fact that they've decided to stop making adventure games (as I consider them; you are free to disagree) is the way the company's image and culture have changed. There was a time when Telltale Games represented, to me, the hope that game developers didn't have to be cold and indifferent to their fans. They listened, they interacted, they were incredibly responsive to our every concern. Actual devs posted on the forums. When I had a problem, I told old-tyme TTG rep Emily and she went so far out of her way to help me that I was amazed, and I told her so in an email.

    Here's what I said:

    I want to say that you guys are fantastic, and not just for keeping the adventure genre alive with some really great games (although certainly that!). The way Telltale does... well, everything impresses me, from customer service (When the first sam and max DVD came out, I didn't have a DVD-ROM drive... you guys sent me a CD-ROM even though I was the only one with this issue, and still sent me the DVD to boot!) to giving the people what they want (Around the time TT formed, the cries for Sam and Max were everywhere, and you brought us Sam and Max. Almost as incessant were the demands for Monkey Island, and although it must have taken a lot of doing, now you've done that too). You guys really listen to and communicate with your fans, and I really appreciate it. Even in press releases and on the website, where most game companies would use stilted PR speak, Telltale communicates in a way that immediately sets a gamer like me at ease - "don't worry, man, we get it."

    Boy, was I ever a satisfied customer. To me, Telltale seems to no longer be the sort of company I was talking about there - now they're like most game companies, which disappoints me. Plenty of people like their new games and I honestly wish them success, but I won't be paying much attention anymore.

    Those were good times man...

  • Well, I doubt many will read this, but in the sake of fairness I wanted to note that the devs still post on the forums, which is cool. But I really felt hung out to dry by Telltale when they followed the announcement of King's Quest with two years of utter silence and a cancellation. Combine that with statements about how the traditional adventure game genre doesn't need Telltale anymore, how they're "not about the past," and how puzzles are history, and I can't even recognize today's Telltale anymore.

    I guess now that Walking Dead is a huge hit, Telltale doesn't need or want those of us who made the company a success in the first place anymore. CEO Dan Connors has made it crystal clear that there is no room in his company's future for traditional adventure games. For the record, I am well aware that Telltale doesn't owe me anything - I bought their games, I enjoyed their games, that's a fair transaction. But for me (and I doubt I'm the only one) it really sucks.

  • @tim333 said: Well, I doubt many will read this, but in the sake of fairness I wanted to note that the devs still post on the forums, which is cool. But I really felt hung out to dry by Telltale when they followed the announcement of King's Quest with two years of utter silence and a cancellation. Combine that with statements about how the traditional adventure game genre doesn't need Telltale anymore, how they're "not about the past," and how puzzles are history, and I can't even recognize today's Telltale anymore.

    I guess now that Walking Dead is a huge hit, Telltale doesn't need or want those of us who made the company a success in the first place anymore. CEO Dan Connors has made it crystal clear that there is no room in his company's future for traditional adventure games. For the record, I am well aware that Telltale doesn't owe me anything - I bought their games, I enjoyed their games, that's a fair transaction. But for me (and I doubt I'm the only one) it really sucks.

    This is exactly how I feel. Moving away from actual adventure games and towards interactive movie non-games is one thing, but the way Telltale reps repeatedly insult the adventure game genre that is finally making a comeback thanks in large part to Kickstarter really makes me sick. Telltale never did much good for the adventure game genre, anyway. They just tried to suck all remaining life out of popular, existing adventure brands, then tried to convince us all, in a self-serving way, that adventure games as we have known and loved them are over and done with and that interactive movies are the future. What was pathetic was how, for a while, many in the gaming press actually went along with this self-serving PR talking point of theirs.

    Telltale people will say they love adventure games when it suits them, but will turn their backs on the adventure game community in a heartbeat if it's in their interests. That's the thanks Telltale gives the adventure game community who helped build them up.

    I'm one former Telltale supporter who will not feel bad if the upcoming Telltale interactive movie non-games are huge flops.

    Oh, and why has Telltale almost never released a game based on original material?

    Telltale's motto: "We seek out franchises with the biggest fan bases possible, then we apply our interactive movie formula to the material. If you want original and new and fresh, go to Double Fine. We don't do original. We draw our inspiration from the early 1980's Dragon's Lair."

    When it comes to Tim Schafer, Gilbert and Dave Grossman, many have said that it's not hard to see who was, and who wasn't, the real creative brains behind Day of the Tentacle and Monkey Island. Now, I don't want to speak ill of anyone, even though Grossman and Connors have put down adventure games and those who are making actual adventure games, but I can see why people have thought this for a while now.

    If there was an adventure game franchise I loved, the last people I'd want getting exclusive rights to it is Telltale Games.

  • @MtnPeak said: If there was an adventure game franchise I loved, the last people I'd want getting exclusive rights to it is Telltale Games.

    Yes. Right now I feel the same. But I remember when they annonced ToMI and I instantly preordered it and thought: This is the most exciting day in my life. Something changed. Today I'd be really worried.

  • I'm not really mad at them anymore.


    I think the biggest problem we had with Telltale Games is expectation. We expected Dave Grossman and Mike Stemmle, who worked on the Monkey Island series for LucasArts, to care about classic adventure games and to be loyal to their fanbase.

    We expected, because TTG's first developed games were from classic adventure game franchises, that they would devote themselves to be the leaders in the industry to usher in a new golden age of adventure games.

    We expected that Dan Connors' only having worked on one adventure game prior to TTG [ie. Sam & Max:Hit the Road (source here and here)] would not speak anything to whether he would be loyal specifically to fans of that game by forever continuing to make more like it.


    For myself, now that my expectations of TTG have changed to no longer include these things; and now that I better understand their intent, not to ruin the classic adventure game genre, but rather to themselves focus primarily on story... I'm now no longer mad at them. Perhaps I'm still disappointed that they are not all of these things which we originally expected of them, but I'm not furiously disenchanted like I used to be.


    Suffice it to say that they will make the games that they want to make instead of just what I want them to make, and I don't begrudge them anymore for it becuse there really are other companies out there making good classic adventure games.


    Now... that being said, these forums are still my primary hangout for community on the net, and if Telltale changes the forums to be a Reddit clone I'm likely to give up and move my presence to Double Fine.

  • I love TWD and it was my first telltale game but i also pursached BTTF and Poker night 1 and 2 and i really enjoyed those games . I know TWD fanbase has screwd the forums up a bit. Cause TWD fans only Bitch and Moan about episode release date instead of having fun to any of the harcore TTG fans im sorry TWD screwd these forums

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    @der_ketzer said: Yes. Right now I feel the same. But I remember when they annonced ToMI and I instantly preordered it and thought: This is the most exciting day in my life. Something changed. Today I'd be really worried.

    Simple cause and effect.

    Telltale makes games true to the chosen license.

    That definitely means:
    Telltale picks up traditional adventure game license >>> Telltale makes traditional adventure game.
    Telltale choses to not make traditional adventure game >>> Telltale drops traditional adventure game license.

    That's all there is. Yet the equation

    Telltale doesn't make traditional adventures >>> Telltale can't make traditional adventures

    that keeps popping up is downright stupid very very debatable.

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