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Pirating Games: Good Gods, Read This

posted by DAISHI on - last edited - Viewed by 715 users

http://www.greenheartgames.com/2013/04/29/what-happens-when-pirates-play-a-game-development-simulator-and-then-go-bankrupt-because-of-piracy/

Over 93.6% of players stole the game. We know this because our game contains some code to send anonymous-usage data to our server. Nothing unusual or harmful. Heaps of games/apps do this and we use it to better understand how the game is played. It’s absolutely anonymous and you are covered by our privacy policy. Anyway, the cracked version has a separate ID so I can separate the data. I’m sure some of the players have firewalls and some will play offline therefore the actual number of players for the cracked version is likely much higher.

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    Jennifer Moderator

    @der_ketzer said: Still I am convinced without Steam indie games on PC would still be dead and not nearly have the exposure they get from simply being on Steam / having a Steamsale.


    It used to be that way, but now that GOG.com has a focus on indie games (and promotes them well), as well as places like Desura that seem to thrive on indie games, the PC indie games market isn't as dependent on Steam as it used to be.

    It's true that there's a lot of people out there who only buy on Steam, but there's a lot of people out there who only buy on GOG.com as well. And, even more people who buy from both sites. You'll likely get more sales if you get your game on Steam (the ideal situation is always to get your game to as many outlets as possible), but since the indie market on the other platforms is thriving now, there's potential for profit even if you don't.

  • @Vainamoinen said: Contradict me. Please. Contradict me: Greenlight is a survey among Steam users with the intent to find out which indie games have ALREADY garnered enough of a fan base to prove lucrative to Valve. It doesn't raise the general interest of PC gamers in indie games by an inch.

    Not contradicting you at all, but merely pointing out that I said "things like Greenlight".

    Greenlight itself is basically a popularity contest where the winners get their game on Steam for me to completely ignore until they go on sale. It's far from an ideal way for indie games to become more well-known, but if nothing else, it's a start.

  • Thing is, this game would have fared much better in my opinion if the dude just gave, like, Total Biscuit a copy of his game to review. The best kind of bump is a Colbert bump.

    Right now it feels like a jumping the shark moment, by putting the game yourself on BitTorrent and then telling everybody that 90% pirated the game. No fucking shit Sherlock, nobody even knew about this game.

    Needless to say, if he went the actual normal way instead of this way I would have purchased the game, but he kind of ruined it for himself.

  • I have confirmed that the "three-computer limit" is completely false. I have no clue why they state there is one, but there isn't one at all. Maybe you can only access the link they give you three times, or something.

    And... well, if I can actually talk about the game itself, I found it to be inferior to the mobile game it's cloning, "Game Dev Story" by Kairosoft.

    I was expecting there to be a lot more to it, basically. For double the price, I was expecting at least 1.5X the content of the mobile game, as 2X is probably too much to ask.

    I didn't even get that, though, because the progression isn't regulated at all.

    When I was still in the garage, I recreated Surgeon Simulator and suddenly earned $4,000,000 in profit, over ten times what I previously earned per game. This set off a chain reaction where nothing I could do to benefit my company was of any risk to me.

    I made a few more games in the $4M profit range, but then The Artificials happened.

    The Artificials was my company's version of The Sims, and it ruined the fun of the game for me. It made $50M, which was again over ten times what the previous games I was making made. It turned my previous snowball into an absolute steamroll, getting me to the final area of the game much faster than I probably should have been able to.

    It eventually got to the point where I could make multiple high-profile failures just to try to upgrade things to see if I'd unlock anything new, and spend nearly $6M a month on various upkeep costs without it denting my overall income in the slightest.

    While Tycoon does bring some interesting aspects(I really like the engine system), Story has a better progression system that doesn't let one game ruin any semblance of challenge, and more consoles, both original ones made by the devs and obscure ones that the Tycoon devs didn't care to add, like the Neo Geo and the Sega Saturn.

  • @RingmasterJ5 said: I have confirmed that the "three-computer limit" is completely false. I have no clue why they state there is one, but there isn't one at all. Maybe you can only access the link they give you three times, or something.

    Well, that's extremely reassuring. They really should have worded that better.

  • Just as I expected, they actually needed this controversy to get their game out in the public.

  • @GaryCXJk said: Thing is, this game would have fared much better in my opinion if the dude just gave, like, Total Biscuit a copy of his game to review. The best kind of bump is a Colbert bump.

    Right now it feels like a jumping the shark moment, by putting the game yourself on BitTorrent and then telling everybody that 90% pirated the game. No fucking shit Sherlock, nobody even knew about this game.

    Needless to say, if he went the actual normal way instead of this way I would have purchased the game, but he kind of ruined it for himself.

    This is the problem many Indie games face if you have a shoestring advertising budget. How do you define "The Normal Way"? How many indie games do you miss out on each year? Multiply that across a population, then insert the number of people that pirate games.

  • Except people don't pirate games they don't know about. For an indie game to get pirated, one has to purchase it first, unless the developer himself puts it on the web somewhere.

    I doubt people have pirated Latura.

  • @GaryCXJk said: Just as I expected, they actually needed this controversy to get their game out in the public.

    So what you're saying is that this is perhaps not just an experiment in piracy, but also a publicity stunt?


    In other words, advertising is paid for; publicity is not. And they very well could have done this in order to garner free market awareness (ie. publicity) for their game.

    ...Now, if only it was more readily available to purchase.

  • Did you know that we have to work 20 days to buy a video game in our country?

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