User Avatar Image

Help me to learn English Like a native

posted by N7. on - last edited - Viewed by 1.3K users

Hi, I would like to learn English but in our country and in our schools they really don't teach us English! just a little about grammatical rules :( I learned a little by myself ! but still I have some problems

I just need you guys come here some times and help me to find out some of my questions about this language

thanks

186 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Iran does not usually encourage vacations to English-speaking countries.

    Anyway, the usual usage would be "I made" over "I did make", but "I did make" is OK if there is a special emphasis on it. For example:

    Mother: Why are you eating those cookies? I told you to make a sandwich!

    Child: I did make a sandwich! And I'm still hungry!

  • User Avatar Image
    N7.

    Thanks guys, all of you
    I have Some more questions.

    1- What is the meaning of "you're not above murder"! Does it mean that you're not worse than death or murder?
    2- What does "She's gonna snap" mean
    3- What does "on edge" mean? for example we're all on edge
    4- And what's the meaning of "come to a head" for example Things are coming to a head

  • "You're not above...." followed by anything just means the person does not have the morals to avoid doing it. So "You're not above murder" means that "You" would consider murdering someone.

    "She's gonna snap" means there is a lot of pressure on her, and she is trying to remain calm, but when she "snaps," she'll do something crazy or violent.

    "On edge" just means nervous, like if you were on the edge of a cliff, you might be nervous that you might lose your balance and fall off. It's that sort of metaphor.

    "Come to a head" means various actions are about to reach their conclusions, usually according to someone's plans. You can see that something big is about to happen as a result.

  • User Avatar Image
    N7.

    @WarpSpeed said: "You're not above...." followed by anything just means the person does not have the morals to avoid doing it. So "You're not above murder" means that "You" would consider murdering someone.

    "She's gonna snap" means there is a lot of pressure on her, and she is trying to remain calm, but when she "snaps," she'll do something crazy or violent.

    "On edge" just means nervous, like if you were on the edge of a cliff, you might be nervous that you might lose your balance and fall off. It's that sort of metaphor.

    "Come to a head" means various actions are about to reach their conclusions, usually according to someone's plans. You can see that something big is about to happen as a result.



    Thanks, then "Come to a head" means that I'm working hard on a game and after 2 years when my game is almost complete I can say things come to a head and I'll can release my game soon. correct?
    Does it just mean reaching to a conclusion? or reaching to an end?

    And about "you're not above murder" even with your guidance I couldn't find out what this exactly means

  • You're not above means you are likely to do it and or have done it in the past
    It is a way of accusing someone in a way by saying someone is not above... you are basically saying you have done it in the past and are likely to do it again Lilly in TWD was basically saying that Kenny was a murderer and is not the kind of person who won't repeat it

  • @N7. said: Thanks, then "Come to a head" means that I'm working hard on a game and after 2 years when my game is almost complete I can say things come to a head and I'll can release my game soon. correct?
    Does it just mean reaching to a conclusion? or reaching to an end?



    Or "things are coming to a head," which is the usual way to say it. It also tends to be used for big things, so your 2-year project would be good, but you would not use that phrase on a 2-hour project. It only works for reaching an end if it is according to plan.

    @N7. said: And about "you're not above murder" even with your guidance I couldn't find out what this exactly means

    Normally, "not above" is used when talking about someone else, like: "Stay away from Bruno. He's not above shooting you if you get in the way." That is, most people would not shoot you for getting in the way, but Bruno might.

  • User Avatar Image
    N7.

    What's the difference between ledge and edge?
    What is the meaning of go sideways
    And what does coupling mean
    thanks

  • User Avatar Image
    Darth Marsden Moderator

    if you're after the meanings of individual words, a dictionary would probably be more useful than us!

    I'll give it a go though:

    The difference between an edge and a ledge is that, while the edge of something is where it stops existing (the edge of a table, for example, is the point where the table stops), a ledge is something like a shelf that's sticking out of a horizontal surface. A window ledge, for example, is that little bit of wood (or whatever) that sticks out beneath the actual window.

    "Go sideways"... in the more literal sense it means to move to the side, as in the left or right. If someone goes sideways then they're going to the left or the right instead of straight ahead. If this is being used in conversation, I'd probably need to hear the context it's used before I can give a better definition.

    As for coupling, there's a couple of different meanings.
    - When two objects join together (for example, when the things that connect train carriages are actually connected together, that would be a coupling).
    - When two people form a relationship (for example, if I got a girlfriend, we would be a couple, and the act of us becoming a couple is a coupling)

  • User Avatar Image
    N7.

    if you're after the meanings of individual words, a dictionary would probably be more useful than us!



    I'm using three dictionaries for this purpose, But it's hard sometimes to understand what's the exact meaning of a word like "flirting"
    My language is a lot different from your language

    For example I've read description on dictionaries about word "flirting" but still I have doubt
    Does it mean having s*x with someone or it means talking or acting with or around someone only because they have s*xy attraction?

  • User Avatar Image
    Darth Marsden Moderator

    If you're acting flirty with someone, then you're teasing them with sexual advances. It's not always a straight-up declaration of wanting to have sex, but it's a good start.

    For example, if I approached puzzlebox and said "You have the most beautiful lips. Do you mind if I kiss them?", then I'd be flirting with her (and she'd no doubt slap me in return, given my past history at this sort of thing).

Add Comment