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Silence

posted by Fiddle Diddle on - last edited - Viewed by 309 users

In the beginning of the game we're told that silence is a viable option. However, did any of you find an instance in which silence was the preferable option? I mean even once?

It seems to me that remaining silent during the timed decision conversations only to serves to piss people off or diminish Lee's decisiveness.

At best, remaining silent only presented little easter eggs, Duckpocalypse comes to mind.

Anyway, I'm asking because obviously I haven't tried silence at every opportunity. Was there ever a time when it was strategically or emotionally beneficial not to talk, or was this game mechanic just thrown in to add pressure to the decisions we make by punishing us if we can't make up our minds?

24 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Certain instances where asking things would piss someone off, like asking Christa about her past. It is either to ask her and she gets defensive, or not asking at all and remaining silent. Also, with Kenny after the meat locker, everything you can say to him is bad, and although silence isn't good either, it's better than flat out calling him out to his face. In the attic, instead of heating up the situation with Kenny, staying silent every once in awhile could work. Silence after Kenny's death, for I didn't really want to talk about it. Silence about taking Ben in, since I didn't HATE Ben, but I didn't really want him with us.

  • Silence is also the preferable option when arriving at the docks in Savannah, and realizing there's no boat, that would take us anywhere.

  • ALL Clementine's questions about of her parents, I answered by silence, and also when I, Omid and Christa converged across the River street, after sign collapsed after Christa, I asked: "can You give me something to help," and then I came down keeping silence, leaving friends at a loss, it was cool.

  • I guess that's how this game is tailored to the individual. I can be sort of confrontational and I don't like leaving things unsaid, so that could have something to do with it. I know that it all panned out the same way in the end, but for me the game had more rewarding outcomes if you spoke your mind. Even if it meant hurting people, like Kenny after the meat locker, honesty like that results in more solid friendships in the long run.

  • I never used silence In my main playthrough, but I did do a playthrough were I did and it was pretty funny at parts.

  • The first time I used silence was in Episode 4, when you and Kenny discover that all the boats are gone. I was just so shocked I couldn't say anything. I also struggled with Ben, when he asked me what I thought of him telling Kenny or not. I was also silent during the "Vote Ben Out of the Group" discussion. And that's pretty much it.

  • I think silence isn't the best option in most scenarios, but a couple of times when i used it i got a ton of extra dialogue that couldn't be found otherwise.

  • @Mornai said: I think silence isn't the best option most scenarios, but a couple of times when i used it i got a ton of extra dialogue that couldn't be found otherwise.



    But sometimes the best way it's a silence. Especially in dialogs about Clementine's parents.

  • I remember being silent when I was trying to sneak into the St. John's house and Brenda called out.
    Didn't get me far.

  • @zev_zev said: But sometimes the best way it's a silence. Especially in dialogs about Clementine's parents.



    Agreed, but sometimes silence isn't an option. When she asks you what will happen if her parents come back home and she isn't there(episode 1), you must say something and can't be silent. I always say they'll track us down.

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