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    Darth Marsden Moderator

    I'm guessing it's from a deleted scene? I never got round to watching those.

  • It's from the blooper reel. Same for the other gif.

    In the first gif I showed, it's a blooper from where Tony Stark leads one of the giant flying tank-dinos to the group. Ruffalo, instead of doing the "I'm always angry" line, just said, "Dudes, you're on your own!" and legged it.

    Which was, oddly enough, a far more Banner-appropriate response.

  • User Avatar Image
    Darth Marsden Moderator

    I must watch this so-called "Blooper Reel".

  • It's pretty brilliant. You could tell that everyone there got along pretty well, because you don't have bloopers like these in a cast with poor synergy.

    There's also an amazing one where Tom Hiddleston does his impression of how Alan Rickman would play Loki.

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    Darth Marsden Moderator

    YouTube'd it. 'tis indeed a lot of fun.

  • @Darth Marsden said: Considering he's appeared in two films now, I'm guessing he's here for the long run.

    Sorry, slight spoiler there. My bad.



    Not when he signed a two-film contract it's not.

  • I thought he signed a six film contract?

    Also, his second appearance was kinda a last minute thing. Like he and Robert Downey Jr. hung out after the Oscars and RDJ was like "Hey dude, wanna be in an after credits thing for Iron Man 3" and Ruffalo was like "Fuck yeah!" and then the next week they met up, shot for an hour and were done.

  • @Alcoremortis said: It's pretty brilliant. You could tell that everyone there got along pretty well, because you don't have bloopers like these in a cast with poor synergy.

    There's also an amazing one where Tom Hiddleston does his impression of how Alan Rickman would play Loki.



    Yes, it is brilliant.

  • So, what issues of the comics approximate out to the five episode "Phoenix Saga" from the X-Men cartoon?

  • User Avatar Image
    Darth Marsden Moderator

    It's been a while since I watched the cartoon, so lemme refresh my memory.

    OK, the plain Phoenix saga was The X-Men #101-108, while the Dark Phoenix saga was Uncanny X-Men #129-137.

    From Wikipedia:
    [Quote]The entire saga of the Phoenix is retold and adapted in the third season of the X-Men animated series, subdivided into the five-part "Phoenix Saga", in which Jean acquires the power of the Phoenix and the battle for the M'Kraan Crystal occurs, and the "Dark Phoenix Saga", showcasing the battle with the Hellfire Club, the Phoenix Force's transformation into Dark Phoenix, and the battle to decide her fate.

    These particular episodes are as close as the cartoon came to directly duplicating the comic book storylines — the "Dark Phoenix Saga" is so accurate to the original stories that the episodes have the additional credit, "Based on stories by Chris Claremont".

    Notably, however, as the Phoenix Force retcon had occurred before the creation of the series, the episodes were made with this change in mind — rather than having Jean develop her powers independently (as was the original intent of the comics), or be replaced by the cosmic Phoenix Force entity (as events were later retconned), the two concepts were merged, into Jean's actual body being possessed by the Phoenix Force, leading to a true struggle between two independent entities.

    Jean is shown piloting a shuttle, and when her telekenetic shield fails Phoenix enters her body. Rather than destroying an inhabited system — which was the cause for the decision to kill off the character in the comics — the animated story had her destroy a deserted system and only disable the attacking Shi'Ar cruiser. These changes made it possible for aspects of the original ending of Uncanny X-Men #137, in which Jean survives, to be used.

    Jean does still commit suicide (taking control of the Shi'Ar's laser beam to fire on herself, rather than finding an ancient weapon), but with her death, the Phoenix Force is purified, and then uses its powers to resurrect Jean, drawing on the combined life-force of the assembled X-Men to bring her back to life. Jean retained her original basic powers, whereas in the aborted comic book ending, she would have been lobotomized by the Shi'Ar and lost them entirely. [/Quote]

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