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Way too easy for fans of the genre

posted by Anonymous on - last edited - Viewed by 1.5K users

Man, what a dissapointment. Each puzzle took only a maximum of two minutes to figure out, they practically tell you exactly what to do. Now I know it's episodic and the general length of the game was fine by me but if only the puzzles were a teeny bit challanging I would have rejoiced. The last Sam and Max had puzzles that took me up to three days to figure out with solutions that took much trail and error and creative 'thinking-outside-the-box' logic to it. Things with an internal logic that normally could never work but in the world of the game makes perfect sense. This was simply point A to Point B stuff. Now I know they want to draw in a fresh audience that might be turned away from any difficulty and I hope the next episode will ease into greater difficulty but to the people who actually have been waiting for this game for over a decade then it's a bummer. Maybe a difficulty setting next episode? Still made me laugh outloud though.

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    Anonymous

    [quote]I don't necessarily want a game without any challenge, so perhaps the difficulty is something to work on,

    BUT

    To me, graphic adventures were never about solving puzzles anyway. The puzzles were just a handy prop to hang the story and characters and other design goodies on. I think Psychonauts was everything I wanted in an adventure game, but it played like a platformer. Puzzles are just a tradition and while it's good to make the best of them, it's not what's really important here.[/quote]

    I would disagree. The entire gameplay is puzzle (minus the short driving part) and if the core of the game isn't fufilling then all the frosting on the cake isn't satisfying. If i'm playing a shooter and all the enemies do is walk in a straight line, the story-line and style can be amazing but you still don't have a good shooter. So if you take away the strong point of the genre your left with somthing that won't appeal to the people that like it.

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    Anonymous

    The below may comprise largely of opinion:

    Yes, the puzzles are what makes up most of the gameplay, but they're not the things that make it an adventure game.

    I play a shooting game because I feel an urge to blast stuff, and I play a RTS game because I feel an urge to use my brain to blast stuff. I play an adventure game because I feel the urge to lose myself in a story for a while. If it's puzzles that provide the mechanism for that, fine, but if not then at long as it provides me with a story a character focused experience that I've come to expect from adventures, I don't see what I'm missing.

    The fact is, as gameplay, adventure puzzles historically aren't even that fun. Maybe two thirds or more of puzzles in adventure games are either easy enough to get right away or so hard that most people use a walkthrough to get past it. The remaining third are subtle ones that you might wonder about for a little while and then actually work out. If the puzzles were what really mattered I would have given up on adventures long, long ago. The FUN part about solving puzzles is being able to progress that little bit further in the story.

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    Anonymous

    The progression of the story should be a reward for doing somthing though. If I'm playing a action game or and RPG and I defeat a boss, I get rewarded with a cutscene and maybe a weapon. You get such a better feeling when you think you diserve the progression of the story. I absolutly love the feeling of somthing clicking in your brain when your stumped when you finally understand how somthing can be solved. In Culture Shock, I had a bit of a "well duh" feeling as the game attempted to reward my solution.

  • [quote]Puzzles are just a tradition and while it's good to make the best of them, it's not what's really important here.[/quote]

    I think you're more right than a lot of people want to believe.

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    Anonymous

    I'm a hardcore gamer, but I don't play a lot of adventure games. I'm not a fan of the slow pace or getting stuck in an adventure game. The getting stuck part makes the slow pace of most adventure games unbearable.

    I thought the difficulty of Sam and Max was spot on. It was hard at places (I was starting to feel frustrated while breaking the hypnosis), but in general I felt like it flowed well. I did it all in one sitting (took me 4 or 5 hours), but near the end I felt like putting the game down (like I said, I'm not a fan of adventure games, but this one was one of the best I've played). The only thing that kept me going was the fact that if I finished this episode I'd be ready to start on the next. So if the game were more difficult, I would have probably started getting behind in episodes (and based on my experience of the episodic content of Wing Commander: Secret Ops, I know that ultimately means not finishing the series [I haven't finished WC:Secret Ops after almost 8 years])

    I'll definately pick up the next episode (Thank God for Gametap!).

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    Anonymous

    All other games have difficulty levels, why can't Sam & Max have it?

    Some people are hardcore gamers, and they play their first person shooter games at the "nightmare" difficulty, while other unexperienced gamers choses to play with less enemies etc. It's natural in all other genres except the adventure genre.

    I want mega-monkey.

  • How often do adventure games have difficulty levels? Almost never. I don't think it would be an easy or necessary thing to accomplish.

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    Anonymous

    how about some kind of hidden location, that can only be accessed with some difficult puzzle solving.. casual gamers can ignore it.. the rest can try and find it..

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    Anonymous

    [quote]How often do adventure games have difficulty levels? Almost never. I don't think it would be an easy or necessary thing to accomplish.[/quote]

    Monkey Island II and III had it.

    It's necessary because it's the only way to please hardcore adventure gamers AND people who just want to have a good story. Otherwise, you must chose one of them, and lose the other one.

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    Anonymous

    Think about it, monkey island 2 and CMI's easy modes were just the same game with some puzzles taken out.

    So for it to work, Telltale would either have to make the game longer with harder puzzles in the extra bits, for hard mode, which would take a whole lot more time, or make it the same length but make easy mode much shorter than the already short 3-4 hours, which is no good either.

    The only other alternative would be to make easy and hard mode the same length but make some of the puzzles completely different, but again that'd involve a much greater workload.

    As far as I see the best compromise is to make the puzzles slightly harder than they are currently, but not enough to turn off the casual gamers.

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