User Avatar Image

Other platforms

posted by Anonymous on - last edited - Viewed by 978 users

Just wanted to know if TellTale is thinking of making their games for other platforms as well? Linux and Mac OS (X) for example? I can tell you a few good reasons why that would be a good idea, but first I'd just like to know if TT is even interested in something in this direction. (that, and the fact that I have to study for my next exam!)

45 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    then was i wrong

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    [quote]MI 4 And Grim fandago worked file with me in ScummVM[/quote]
    Really?

    Whoops, my bad then ...didn't check which non-SCUMM games play on ScummVM :]
    Surprisingly it's not on ScummVM's compatibility list.
    *goes double check*
    Oh, it's there under Subprojects as "Residual". Heh, my bad. All the more reason that I buy a copy of MI4 and Grim Fadango :]

    With this said, yea - I'd be completely fine if TellTale games would work hand-in-hand with ScummVM to make their games work on other platforms.

    p.s. thanks for correcting my mistake [:">]

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    Yeah, the SCUMMVM team were working on something similar to SCUMMVM but for the GRIMe engine. But they decided that SCUMMVM was more important, and the GRIMe engine won't happen for a while. But if it does happen, it should be possible to convert Grim Fandango or EMI to other platforms

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    [quote]EMI and GF both use the GRIME engine, don't they? So how could they work with ScummVM? (I wish they did, though--then I could play EMI with OS X.)
    [/quote]

    The "Residual" subproject/CVS module (of ScummVM) is intended to play GRIME games. I hope I made your day. ;;)

    Yea, Linux and Mac OS X ports of great games would make make my millenium too. And I guess, since Mac OS X uses a similar kernel as Linux, there shouldn't be too much hussle making both ports work.

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    [quote][quote]EMI and GF both use the GRIME engine, don't they? So how could they work with ScummVM? (I wish they did, though--then I could play EMI with OS X.)
    [/quote]

    The "Residual" subproject/CVS module (of ScummVM) is intended to play GRIME games. I hope I made your day. ;;) [/quote]

    ...Yes, yes you did. Whooooo!

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    still gota play Grim fandago

    games i played

    mi1
    mi2
    mi3
    beneath a steel sky
    DOTT
    Maniac mansion
    The Dig (almost finished)
    Simon The Sorceror 2
    Broken Sword 2 (almost finished,deleted my last save game :(( )

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    Hmm ...don't remember MI3 being on the ScummVM compatibility list (and it isn't SCUMM-based), but ok. You were kinda right with the MI5 and GF.

    Anyhoo, I think we're getting "slightly" off topic here. This is not a "what-i've-succeeded-to-run-onScummVM" topic. :p

    It appears that there would be interest for Linux and Mac ports, but there hasn't been a single reply from a TellTale member yet. It'd be great if we got an official "yes" on this matter. ...That'd make my day/millenium :D

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    Just had to stop by and say a couple of things here...

    Firstly, I welcome the thought of TellTale releasing their games on multiple platforms.

    Secondly, in order to maximize the user base and minimize additional development cost for any ports, I submit the following suggestion:

    Release the game on one disc, containing the data files and whichever platform engines TellTale wish to make themselves.
    Then, release the source code of the engine only (obviously you do NOT want to use the GPL), or even just the bits and pieces required to be different between platforms, and let the fans do ports to whatever operating system they would like to see the game ported to. THEN, gather those engines on the TellTale website and put them up for download, so people who go out and buy the disc can download a suitable engine for whatever platform they currently use.

    Of course, this requires that TellTale be utterly devoted to their fans, but in return they will surely gain a huge and completely loyal fanbase (relative to the number of adventure gamers across the world) and can use the ports as the basis of portable engines in the future, thereby cutting development cost on future titles while being able to release multiple engines on one disc.

    Another sideeffect of releasing source code and portable engines will of course be that TellTale's games will outlast most every game on the market today, thanks to devoted fans and constantly updated engines and even new ports to as-of-yet non-existant operating systems and consoles.

    I also hope TellTale will continue LucasArts' fine tradition of educating users on the importance of always installing and playing off of a backup in order to protect the original from damage. Being a collector who really cares about keeping my originals in mint condition WAY into the future, I owe a lot to LucasArts for showing me how a true collector works to maintain his collection.

    In summary, I have high hopes for a bright future as TellTale works to bring adventure gaming back to its roots. LucasArts sure won't.

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    That is a very good suggestion actually, cappuchok.
    I was thinking more in the direction of having a close-source native port (on the same CD) or a cooperation with the ScummVM team. Wasn't thinking of such a bold idea as opening the source, but that actually is a great idea. Of course TellTales would have to be (for their own interest depending on how open they are willing to go) careful of what kind of license they would choose or create.

    Just a hint, if you even think of making the games available for more platforms: avoid MS Windows-only libraries like DirectX.
    OpenGL and OpenAL and SDL are just as powerful, and they can be used on many many platforms (including some very exotic ones).

    So. please, TellTale, don't tell us that we (Mac, Linux, ... users) don't cover enough market potential to be worth the hassle. As you see, we *are* worth it ...come on, at least 3 Linux users and 1 Mac user out of 100 ...and trying to be as helpful as we can.

  • User Avatar Image
    Anonymous

    [quote]That is a very good suggestion actually, cappuchok.
    I was thinking more in the direction of having a close-source native port (on the same CD) or a cooperation with the ScummVM team. Wasn't thinking of such a bold idea as opening the source, but that actually is a great idea. Of course TellTales would have to be (for their own interest depending on how open they are willing to go) careful of what kind of license they would choose or create.[/quote]
    Even a closed-source cooperation with ScummVM would result in an open-source portable engine, even though the actual original engine on which this FOSS engine would be based would not be available to the public. On one level, I can see how this solution would be prefferable when it comes to non-disclosure agreements and stuff like that (since the ScummVM team is a more clearly defined entity than the entire community).
    But if TellTale wants to go full-out and opensource the original engine I'm all for it. :x Just BE CAREFUL when you select a license - or even better devise a useful license on your own, based off of one of the opensource.org Approved Licenses.

    [quote]Just a hint, if you even think of making the games available for more platforms: avoid MS Windows-only libraries like DirectX.
    OpenGL and OpenAL and SDL are just as powerful, and they can be used on many many platforms (including some very exotic ones).[/quote]
    I hearily agree. OpenGL / OpenAL / SDL is definitely the way to go if porting to other operating systems. Proprietary technology tends to never live beyond the lifespan of the product that promotes it, while these mentioned open standards will continue to live on even on the next generations of operating systems.

    [quote]So. please, TellTale, don't tell us that we (Mac, Linux, ... users) don't cover enough market potential to be worth the hassle. As you see, we *are* worth it ...come on, at least 3 Linux users and 1 Mac user out of 100 ...and trying to be as helpful as we can.[/quote]
    I bet that whatever market potential there is for the Linux and Mac ports (and PocketPC, and Palm, and whatever) the community (proudly headed by ScummVM) will do each of us our best, in order to *make* it worth it for TellTale. If we can show them that we *really care* about their games (making ports, getting the word out to our non-adventuring friends, creating good publicity etc, in short devoting our time to promoting and helping TellTale) then we can hope that they in turn will respect us as good and loyal customers and give something back to the community all in good time. It's the way it *should* work, and just because the major players (EA, Infogrames (*puke*) and the rest) won't play nice with their loyal fans, doesn't mean an independent developer can't.

    I can of course only speak for myself: I am not a programmer, so I wouldn't be able to help with porting. But I am an active user of both Windows, Linux, Mac and Amiga (yes, you better believe it!). I tend to buy multiplatform discs (such as the Starcraft PC/Mac hybrid) if available, so as to be able to run it on several of my systems. For example, I prefer to bring my Mac when needing to connect to an unfirewalled or otherwise unsecured network, and of course I like to take some games with me on the road. ScummVM thankfully lets me play all my old LucasArts classics whereever I go and whatever computer I happen to use at the time, so portability of the engine, to me, is one of the key selling points of any game, as is the ability to make a backup (to disc or image clone) for day-to-day usage without requiring the use of proprietary software. If on the road, I refuse to be forced to carry original discs with me, and much prefer just taking an image of the game and storing on harddisk, thereby only having to use the original disc once (like any good and caring collector should!).

    Another piece of advice to the TellTale guys:
    Whatever you do, *don't sell out to a major publisher*. Sierra recently sold out to VUGames, and this August ('04) they were suddenly shut down without prior notice or any reasonable explanation - it's safe to assume several good-to-go games were cancelled as a result of this). Microsoft Games, while basically an umbrella label for several major independent studios, does everything possible to minimize the visibility of the actual developer's name and logotypes on the boxes, robbing caring fans of the possibility to choose games by their favourite developers. Infogrames are busy destroying the good reputation of Atari as they endeavour to gobble up every independent developer left in Europe. EA is doing much the same over in the US. As a result of all this, I as a fan of specific developers no longer know quite which games to buy to support, for example, Westwood Studios, without inadvertently (sp?) supporting EA, with whose business practices I happen to disagree strongly. Therefore I now avoid games from the major publishers alltogether, and if I do want to play them (which happens only rarely), I often wait and buy them through one of the independent budget labels who care enough for the games to put out a decent prepatched budget release instead of just reprinting some old discs that still require loads of patches. :((

    I'd say: TellTale - take notice.

    I guess I went slightly off topic there, but it had to be said.

    And yes, we need TellTale to give us some answers as to their intentions when it comes to multiplatform development, porting and community devotion. :-/

Add Comment