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Other platforms

posted by Anonymous on - last edited - Viewed by 895 users

Just wanted to know if TellTale is thinking of making their games for other platforms as well? Linux and Mac OS (X) for example? I can tell you a few good reasons why that would be a good idea, but first I'd just like to know if TT is even interested in something in this direction. (that, and the fact that I have to study for my next exam!)

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    Anonymous

    [quote]Just wanted to know if TellTale is thinking of making their games for other platforms as well? Linux and Mac OS (X) for example? I can tell you a few good reasons why that would be a good idea, but first I'd just like to know if TT is even interested in something in this direction. (that, and the fact that I have to study for my next exam!)[/quote]

    Good idea- I'd love to see games on Linux, especially of the world's best genre...

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    Anonymous

    [quote]Hmm ...don't remember MI3 being on the ScummVM compatibility list (and it isn't SCUMM-based), but ok. ][/quote]

    Yes it is.

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    Anonymous

    [quote][quote]Hmm ...don't remember MI3 being on the ScummVM compatibility list (and it isn't SCUMM-based), but ok. ][/quote]

    Yes it is.[/quote]

    Hmmm ...it really seems so, the last version (8) of SCUMM powered the Curse of Monkey Island (MI3).

    My bad.

    But we really should be getting back on topic!

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    Anonymous

    OK. Getting back to the topic. I like the idea of games being on Linux, but what about a console port like to the Nintendo Gamecube? Especially adventure games lend themselves very much to an environment in which the entire family can participate. Since consoles have to be connected to televisions which ususally stand in the living room, there should be much more adventures on consoles. :D

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    Anonymous

    Console adventure games don't work very well since most involve using the mouse. Try playing the NES version of Maniac Mansion. Then again, they could include a special mouse like in Mario Paint.

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    Anonymous

    [quote]Console adventure games don't work very well since most involve using the mouse. Try playing the NES version of Maniac Mansion. Then again, they could include a special mouse like in Mario Paint.[/quote]

    That nes version sucked incredibly, it was hard and annoying to control, Dave tells you the first and (incredibly) easiest puzzel which is completly pointless and each character has their own annoying repeditive music that makes you want to rip your ears off.

    Yeah....

    I don't like the nes version.

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    Anonymous

    [quote]Console adventure games don't work very well since most involve using the mouse. Try playing the NES version of Maniac Mansion. Then again, they could include a special mouse like in Mario Paint.[/quote]


    your also forgeting that most console adventure games are ports, if you play a game that is ment for console it will be much simpler to controle.

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    Anonymous

    [quote]your also forgeting that most console adventure games are ports, if you play a game that is ment for console it will be much simpler to controle.[/quote]
    But there's also the economic aspect of porting to consider. If a point-and-click adventure was built from the ground up for a console, it would be easy to control on that specific console. However, there would need to be significant adaptations in the control system for each different console as there is no standard layout of buttons and stuff on the joypads.
    Also, when porting such a game to PC or Mac, endusers would likely complain about a way too complex control system compared to the single mouse button interface of classic adventures. So there's another level of adaptation of the control system that would have to be done in order to make the game a pleasant experience. Of course, letting the fans do the porting will likely result in far better control systems for each different system because the developer of a certain port is likely to play that port him/herself many times over and wants a really good control system for him/herself and all the other owners of that particular platform. Thereby also cutting some development costs for TellTale, of course. ;)

    I myself felt that Grim Fandango and EMI were far too console-ish for the PC, as efficient and ergonomic play required a joypad (or a Natural Keyboard), and there was no alternative mouse interface that would have simplified the controls immensely and made the games more enjoyable. Of course, with Grim I could cope with the quirky control system (and pain in my wrists from long gaming sessions) because it was a great story and a compelling game, but with EMI it was just plain annoying because the game wasn't even very good to begin with (seen from the standpoint that really, Ron Gilbert should have done the entire series from beginning to end, so we'd know the real Secret of Monkey Island(TM)). :p

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    Anonymous

    [quote]Console adventure games don't work very well since most involve using the mouse. Try playing the NES version of Maniac Mansion. Then again, they could include a special mouse like in Mario Paint.[/quote]

    But if you are gonna use a mouse, why not just use the computer? Leave consoles for other genres....:P

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    Anonymous

    To be completely frank I am a bit discouraged by the fact that still (it's nearly a week now!) none of the developers replied to this topic. :((

    Then again ...this is maybe just because I've had bad experience with (some other) game companies (including LucasArts)

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